purely-vegan:

That’s still 4 more reasons than is needed. 

^^

purely-vegan:

That’s still 4 more reasons than is needed. 

^^

(Source: veganpuff)

itsnyaaabetch asked: In your idea of a perfect world, no animals would be killed/eaten right? So the entire planet would be surviving on what? How long do you think this world would last like that?

veg-killj0y:

vijara:

This is a great question. As cool as it would be if everyone decided to go vegan, it wouldn’t happen overnight. As more people decide to switch to a humane and compassionate lifestyle, the demand for animal products starts to decline. When this happens, farmers start breeding less animals for consumption.

What effect does this have on the environment?

  • Less carbon dioxide emission (if one person exchanges eating meat for a vegan diet, they’ll reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 1.5 tons per year)
  • less methane production (chickens, turkeys, pigs, and cows are collectively the largest producer of methane in the U.S.)
  • less nitrus oxide (the meat, egg, and dairy industries produce 65% of worldwide nitrous oxide emissions)
  • not to mention that 1 calorie from animal protein requires 11 times as much fossil fuel as one calorie of plant protein
  • and the diets of meat eaters create 7x the greenhouse emissions as the diets of vegans
  • nearly half of all water used in the United States goes to raising animals for food. it takes more than 2,400 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of meat (1 pound of wheat requires 25 gallons)
  • you’d save more water by not eating one pound of meat than you would by not taking a shower for 6 months
  • raising animals for food uses 30% of the earth’s land mass (that’s about the same size as Asia! approx. 17 Million sq. miles. to give you another point of reference, the moon has less area than that, at 14.6 million square miles)
  • more than 260 million acres of U.S. forest have been cleared to create cropland to grow grain to feed farmed animals

Why is raising animals for food so inefficient?

  • 70% of grain and cereals grown in U.S. are fed to farmed animals
  • it requires 16 pounds of grain to produce 1 pound of meat

What does eating meat have to do with people starving in other countries?

  • every ounce of water, grain and resources that goes towards an animal who will ultimately be slaughtered is an ounce of water or grain that could have gone to those who so desperately need it. a study published earlier this year in the journal Environmental Research Letters analyzed the world’s agriculture resource data and found that humans cutting meat from their diets could play a significant role in combating world hunger. According to the researchers, 36 percent of the total calories that come from crops are allocated to farm animal feed, but only 12 percent of those calories actually make it to people’s dinner plates. The researchers concluded that if all of the world’s crops were directly consumed by humans, there would be approximately 70 percent more food available, providing sustenance for an additional 4 billion additional people.

Check out this article, in which the UN is urging a global shift towards a vegan diet -

"A global shift towards a vegan diet is vital to save the world from hunger, fuel poverty and the worst impacts of climate change, a UN report said today.

As the global population surges towards a predicted 9.1 billion people by 2050, western tastes for diets rich in meat and dairy products are unsustainable, says the report from United Nations Environment Programme’s (UNEP) international panel of sustainable resource management.”

So, in short, if the planet begins to move towards a vegan diet, our planet would last much longer, there would be better food opportunities for people who don’t get enough, there would be less damage done to the environment, there would be less disease, and maybe the other sentient beings on this planet will finally be treated with the respect they deserve.

Perfect response.

torontochickensave:

“We asked Animal Caregiver Celeste about her special relationship with Tiny-Comb (aka Rosemary) and this is what she shared:
I’ve known Tiny-Comb for two years now and feel so honored to get as close to her as I have. She endured terror and yet her beautiful spirit still shines. After living in a cramped bare wire cage for most of her adult life, she nearly starved to death before being rescued by Animal Place. So it is no wonder that she takes awhile to warm up to people, in fact, the wonder is that she has warmed up to humans at all.She has a strong personality. She is picky about friends, both chicken and human. Other chickens have large social groups that they spend time with, but Tiny-Comb is more of an introvert, liking to explore on her own and take naps on her perch whenever she likes, regardless of what everyone else is doing. She doesn’t run over with everyone if you bring treats into the barn, but will happily eat if you give her a private meal. She doesn’t always liked to be picked up, but whenever she has found a comfortable spot on my lap, she never wants to leave. She is the only hen I personally have ever seen chase off a rooster who was trying to make a move on her.She is fierce and loving and resilient and amazing. I love her so much. To think that she was shoved in a cage for the unnecessary reason of humans wanting to consume her eggs breaks my heart. To think that there are almost 300 million unique individuals like her still going through that nightmare is devastating.She is why we must continue to do the hard work that we do.Photo by Andrea White”
-Taken from the Animal Place Facebook page.
Choose vegan for Tiny-Comb and all her sisters who are still enslaved and suffering.
Learn more about the egg industry.

torontochickensave:

We asked Animal Caregiver Celeste about her special relationship with Tiny-Comb (aka Rosemary) and this is what she shared:

I’ve known Tiny-Comb for two years now and feel so honored to get as close to her as I have. She endured terror and yet her beautiful spirit still shines. After living in a cramped bare wire cage for most of her adult life, she nearly starved to death before being rescued by Animal Place. So it is no wonder that she takes awhile to warm up to people, in fact, the wonder is that she 
has warmed up to humans at all.

She has a strong personality. She is picky about friends, both chicken and human. Other chickens have large social groups that they spend time with, but Tiny-Comb is more of an introvert, liking to explore on her own and take naps on her perch whenever she likes, regardless of what everyone else is doing. 

She doesn’t run over with everyone if you bring treats into the barn, but will happily eat if you give her a private meal. She doesn’t always liked to be picked up, but whenever she has found a comfortable spot on my lap, she never wants to leave. She is the only hen I personally have ever seen chase off a rooster who was trying to make a move on her.

She is fierce and loving and resilient and amazing. I love her so much. To think that she was shoved in a cage for the unnecessary reason of humans wanting to consume her eggs breaks my heart. To think that there are almost 300 million unique individuals like her still going through that nightmare is devastating.

She is why we must continue to do the hard work that we do.

Photo by Andrea White”

-Taken from the Animal Place Facebook page.

Choose vegan for Tiny-Comb and all her sisters who are still enslaved and suffering.

Learn more about the egg industry.

Being professional at work.

I really try my hardest to remain civil with the heartless comments I get from carnists, and I normally do a very good job ignoring people on the internet; but in the real world, when people are heartless to my face, I have a hard time remaining polite and level headed.
Today at work, amongst much of upper management, an outside consultant we hired was standing by me and a few people as we were putting together a lunch order. I ordered my usual bean curd dish and the consultant looked at me funny and says eww… so I walk away. A coworker tells him that I was vegan, and with a heart booming laugh the consultant yells out to me “oh good, more meat to eat for me”.
My response: “Oh good, once you die from heart disease, more air to breathe for me.

World Week for Animals in Laboratories [ April 19-27 ] 
Getting involved in World Laboratory Animal Liberation Week can be as simple as spreading the word. Here are a few simple things you can do: 

 Live by Example  
The gentlest way to teach is by example. Whenever you choose cosmetics and household products whose ingredients have not been tested on animals, refuse to dissect an animal, write a letter to the editor, or wear a button, you set an example. Live your life in accordance with your principles—others will notice, and many may follow.

 Shop with Compassion  
As the movement to protect animals has grown in size and influence, it has become easier than ever to avoid the use of animals in laboratories every time you open your wallet. Today hundreds of companies conduct no animal testing, dozens more include no animal ingredients, and many make their policies clear on their labels with phrases like “no animal testing,” “cruelty-free,” or “tested by stylists, not on animals.” Drugstores and supermarkets are putting more of these items on their shelves. Every time you purchase an animal-friendly product, you support animal-friendly companies and don’t support companies that continue to use animals. What could be easier? Check out the leaping bunny site for an extensive list of cruelty free products at: Leaping Bunny

 Boycott  
The simplest way to protest the practices of a company that tests on animals is not to purchase any of its products. As more and more people boycott a company’s products, the company will begin to feel the boycott’s adverse effects. A well-organized boycott can pressure companies into changing their ways. Many of the cosmetics companies that have stopped conducting animal tests made the decision, in part, because of the public impact of activist boycotts.

 Wear Your Messages  
Because they are seen by so many people, bumper stickers, buttons and T-shirts are great ways to bring an issue to the public’s attention or to remind people that it is an issue. 

 Read  
The better informed you are, the greater the impact you can make, so read everything you can. A well-referenced book is probably your best source of reliable information. There are many excellent books on issues related to animal research.

 Check out the Charities 
 We all know of many big charities and health foundations whose aim is to help people. What most people don’t know is that many of these groups harm animals in the process by funding or conducting experiments on them. It is important to remind these groups that animal experimentation is a concern for their potential donors. 
 Find Humane Seal-approved charities at following link:Humane Seal

 Join In 
 If there is an animal advocacy organization in your area that is concerned about animals used in research, education, or testing, join it. You’ll be able to keep on top of local issues, you’ll meet others who share your concerns, and you’ll be among the first to know about local activities for animals. The Internet has many sites devoted to animal advocacy issues

 Remember: Animals suffer in labs around the world 365 days a year. Anything you can do to help is appreciated.

 For a list of events you can participate in, check out:
http://www.wwail.org/
http://www.all-creatures.org/wlalw

World Week for Animals in Laboratories [ April 19-27 ]
Getting involved in World Laboratory Animal Liberation Week can be as simple as spreading the word. Here are a few simple things you can do:

Live by Example
The gentlest way to teach is by example. Whenever you choose cosmetics and household products whose ingredients have not been tested on animals, refuse to dissect an animal, write a letter to the editor, or wear a button, you set an example. Live your life in accordance with your principles—others will notice, and many may follow.

Shop with Compassion
As the movement to protect animals has grown in size and influence, it has become easier than ever to avoid the use of animals in laboratories every time you open your wallet. Today hundreds of companies conduct no animal testing, dozens more include no animal ingredients, and many make their policies clear on their labels with phrases like “no animal testing,” “cruelty-free,” or “tested by stylists, not on animals.” Drugstores and supermarkets are putting more of these items on their shelves. Every time you purchase an animal-friendly product, you support animal-friendly companies and don’t support companies that continue to use animals. What could be easier? Check out the leaping bunny site for an extensive list of cruelty free products at: Leaping Bunny

Boycott
The simplest way to protest the practices of a company that tests on animals is not to purchase any of its products. As more and more people boycott a company’s products, the company will begin to feel the boycott’s adverse effects. A well-organized boycott can pressure companies into changing their ways. Many of the cosmetics companies that have stopped conducting animal tests made the decision, in part, because of the public impact of activist boycotts.

Wear Your Messages
Because they are seen by so many people, bumper stickers, buttons and T-shirts are great ways to bring an issue to the public’s attention or to remind people that it is an issue.

Read
The better informed you are, the greater the impact you can make, so read everything you can. A well-referenced book is probably your best source of reliable information. There are many excellent books on issues related to animal research.

Check out the Charities
We all know of many big charities and health foundations whose aim is to help people. What most people don’t know is that many of these groups harm animals in the process by funding or conducting experiments on them. It is important to remind these groups that animal experimentation is a concern for their potential donors.
Find Humane Seal-approved charities at following link:
Humane Seal

Join In
If there is an animal advocacy organization in your area that is concerned about animals used in research, education, or testing, join it. You’ll be able to keep on top of local issues, you’ll meet others who share your concerns, and you’ll be among the first to know about local activities for animals. The Internet has many sites devoted to animal advocacy issues

Remember: Animals suffer in labs around the world 365 days a year. Anything you can do to help is appreciated.

For a list of events you can participate in, check out:
http://www.wwail.org/
http://www.all-creatures.org/wlalw

(Source: onevoiceforanimalrights)

Stop Shielding Controversial Animal Researchers

(Source: the-petition-resource)

Basically, it boils down to cold logic. If we are going to care about the suffering of other humans then logically we should care about the suffering of non-humans too. It is the heartless exploiter of animals, not the animal protectionist, who is being irrational, showing a sentimental tendency to put his own species on a pedestal. We all, thank goodness, feel a natural spark of sympathy for the sufferings of others. We need to catch that spark and fan it into a fire of rational and universal compassion. ~Richard Ryder

Basically, it boils down to cold logic. If we are going to care about the suffering of other humans then logically we should care about the suffering of non-humans too. It is the heartless exploiter of animals, not the animal protectionist, who is being irrational, showing a sentimental tendency to put his own species on a pedestal. We all, thank goodness, feel a natural spark of sympathy for the sufferings of others. We need to catch that spark and fan it into a fire of rational and universal compassion. ~Richard Ryder

(Source: onevoiceforanimalrights)

vegasmo:

This is how a normal un-brainwashed child should perceive a chicken.

(Source: hannahbowl)

onevoiceforanimalrights:

Excerpt from “Patty on Slaughterhouses” 
Twenty-five years ago I made my first abattoir inspection. I had read a study on “dark-cutting” and porcine stress syndrome, which investigated the regular occurrences, measured scientifically, of how stress (fear) affects the quality of meat at the slaughterhouse. The Victorian Department of Agriculture arranged to take me to several slaughterhouses and knackeries to show me first hand how “humane” and regulated the killing was. I was hesitant to go, but determined to prove the absolute fear and terror animals suffer prior to their slaughter.
 The killing lines start early, by 7am I was standing on the narrow walkway above the stun pen. I was dressed in slaughterhouse gear: white coat, rubber boots and white hat covering my hair, my clipboard and pen in hand. The iron chains and heavy metal gates were loud and slamming, steam was rising, the shower room where the cows were hosed down prior to their death was only meters along the chute leading to the stun pen. One by one the cows were jabbed with an electric prod to keep them moving. Their eyes flashed and darted wildly about, their nostrils flared wide open and some were frothing at the mouth. The closer the cows got to the stun box the more frenzied they became, contorting their bodies in all directions to try to go back - to anywhere else. The more they resisted the more the painful jabs from the electric prod forced them forward.
 I braced myself to watch my first murder, I had taken the first sedative in my life an hour earlier, it seemed to get me through. When the cow is locked in the stun box she looks upwards and a captive bolt pistol is aimed at her head. A steel shaft 7cms long penetrates her skull and renders her unconscious. It can take several attempts to hit the right spot. This happened and the cow desperately kept trying to avoid the gun by banging and clanging her body into the sides of the stun pen. Our eyes met just as the bolt entered her head. My life is frozen in that moment and I promised her that for the rest of my life I would do all I could to shut down abattoirs. The blood stained notes from 1981 are still in my files.
 Many more cows, sheep, pigs and horses were to follow in subsequent inspections in various abattoirs. Pigs scream the loudest and fight the hardest to escape the knife. The most prolonged suffering I’ve ever had to witness at an abattoir was in NSW when a free-range pig was approaching the stunner. She went hysterical and was frothing at the mouth and her chest heaved and caved as she struggled valiantly and continuously to escape. I ached to yell out, “STOP, ENOUGH!” and to hold her in my arms, soothe her, give her a drink of cool water then take her to a safe place. Smoke rose from her temples as the man held the electric stunner firmly and longer than normal, to both sides of her head.
 Read the full essay HERE

onevoiceforanimalrights:

Excerpt from “Patty on Slaughterhouses”

Twenty-five years ago I made my first abattoir inspection. I had read a study on “dark-cutting” and porcine stress syndrome, which investigated the regular occurrences, measured scientifically, of how stress (fear) affects the quality of meat at the slaughterhouse. The Victorian Department of Agriculture arranged to take me to several slaughterhouses and knackeries to show me first hand how “humane” and regulated the killing was. I was hesitant to go, but determined to prove the absolute fear and terror animals suffer prior to their slaughter.

 The killing lines start early, by 7am I was standing on the narrow walkway above the stun pen. I was dressed in slaughterhouse gear: white coat, rubber boots and white hat covering my hair, my clipboard and pen in hand. The iron chains and heavy metal gates were loud and slamming, steam was rising, the shower room where the cows were hosed down prior to their death was only meters along the chute leading to the stun pen. One by one the cows were jabbed with an electric prod to keep them moving. Their eyes flashed and darted wildly about, their nostrils flared wide open and some were frothing at the mouth. The closer the cows got to the stun box the more frenzied they became, contorting their bodies in all directions to try to go back - to anywhere else. The more they resisted the more the painful jabs from the electric prod forced them forward.

 I braced myself to watch my first murder, I had taken the first sedative in my life an hour earlier, it seemed to get me through. When the cow is locked in the stun box she looks upwards and a captive bolt pistol is aimed at her head. A steel shaft 7cms long penetrates her skull and renders her unconscious. It can take several attempts to hit the right spot. This happened and the cow desperately kept trying to avoid the gun by banging and clanging her body into the sides of the stun pen. Our eyes met just as the bolt entered her head. My life is frozen in that moment and I promised her that for the rest of my life I would do all I could to shut down abattoirs. The blood stained notes from 1981 are still in my files.

 Many more cows, sheep, pigs and horses were to follow in subsequent inspections in various abattoirs. Pigs scream the loudest and fight the hardest to escape the knife. The most prolonged suffering I’ve ever had to witness at an abattoir was in NSW when a free-range pig was approaching the stunner. She went hysterical and was frothing at the mouth and her chest heaved and caved as she struggled valiantly and continuously to escape. I ached to yell out, “STOP, ENOUGH!” and to hold her in my arms, soothe her, give her a drink of cool water then take her to a safe place. Smoke rose from her temples as the man held the electric stunner firmly and longer than normal, to both sides of her head.

 Read the full essay HERE

veganmovement2012:





As Gary Francione writes, “If you love animals but think that veganism is extreme, then you are confused about the meaning of love.”

This image shows the firing of a captive bolt gun into the skull of a cow. If done “properly,” a long retractable steel rod will penetrate the brain and render the animal unconscious without killing him. Then he will be hung upside down and have his throat slit, dying from massive blood loss. This practice is a part of all commercial cow slaughter, including slaughter under every so-called humane welfare label in the U.S. At the time of being forced into the restraining device to be shot, even the most “humanely” raised animals are confused, terrified, or, in the rare best case scenarios, have been led to their violent and needless execution by someone they trust or even love.Don’t buy the humane myth.Learn more about so-called humane farming at our website: http://freefromharm.org/animal-products-and-ethics/a-comprehensive-analysis-of-the-humane-farming-myth/

veganmovement2012:

As Gary Francione writes, “If you love animals but think that veganism is extreme, then you are confused about the meaning of love.”
This image shows the firing of a captive bolt gun into the skull of a cow. If done “properly,” a long retractable steel rod will penetrate the brain and render the animal unconscious without killing him. Then he will be hung upside down and have his throat slit, dying from massive blood loss. This practice is a part of all commercial cow slaughter, including slaughter under every so-called humane welfare label in the U.S. 

At the time of being forced into the restraining device to be shot, even the most “humanely” raised animals are confused, terrified, or, in the rare best case scenarios, have been led to their violent and needless execution by someone they trust or even love.


Don’t buy the humane myth.

Learn more about so-called humane farming at our website: http://freefromharm.org/
animal-products-and-ethics/a-comprehensive-analysis-of-the-humane-farming-myth/